American Diabetes Month

 

American Diabetes Month 
 
 
 

November is American Diabetes Month, a time to communicate the seriousness of diabetes and the importance of diabetes prevention and control. In the United States, 25.8 million people are affected by diabetes which is more than 8% of the US population. We support the American Diabetes Association in its efforts to raise awareness of the disease and its serious complications.

In recognition of American Diabetes Month, we’ve put together some quick myths and facts about diabetes. If you are diagnosed with diabetes you may have heard some of these misconceptions. So here are some facts about diabetes to help you successfully manage your condition and live a healthy, active life.

 
Myths: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
Facts: No, it does not. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin; type 2 diabetes is caused by the body’s inability to make enough insulin, insulin does not work properly or both.
  
Myths: You will never be able to eat sweets again.
Facts: You will be able to eat a certain amount of sweets as part of a healthy meal plan. 
  
Myths: You have to give up your favorite foods.
Facts: No foods are “off limits.” However, people with diabetes should eat a balanced diet that is low in fat, with meals that focus on whole grain foods, vegetables and fruit.
  

Myths: Diabetes is contagious.

Facts: Diabetes is not spread like a cold or the flu, but a genetic link and lifestyle factors can play a part in the development of the disease.
  
Myths: People with diabetes are more likely to get colds or other illnesses.
Facts: Diabetics are no more likely to get sick, but having diabetes can make an illness more difficult to control. People with diabetes also have a higher risk of developing complications.
  
Myths: Diabetes is not a serious disease.
Facts: Yes it is. Diabetes causes more deaths annually than breast cancer and AIDS combined; two-thirds of diabetics die of heart disease or stroke.
  
Myths: Children can outgrow diabetes.
Facts: Diabetes can be effectively managed, but it cannot be outgrown. Children with type 2 diabetes may experience improved blood sugar levels following puberty or with lifestyle changes, but they will always be predisposed toward elevated blood sugar levels.
 
Myths: Having diabetes means you have to take insulin.
Facts: People with type 1 diabetes require insulin; people with type 2 diabetes may or may not need to take insulin.
 
Myths: Diabetes can be cured by taking insulin.
Facts: There is no cure for diabetes. Insulin helps manage diabetes but it does not rectify the underlying cause of the disease.
 
Myths: You can’t exercise if you have diabetes.
Facts: Yes you can. Exercise helps manage your weight, improve heart health, relieve stress, and aid in blood sugar control.

Knowing the facts about diabetes can help you make smart food choices and wise lifestyle decisions so you can stay healthy. And don’t worry -- crossing your eyes won’t be permanent, gum passes through your digestive system in a matter of days, and it’s okay to swim right after eating. For more information about diabetes, talk with your doctor or visit the American Diabetes Association website at www.diabetes.org.

Are you at risk for Diabetes? How much do you know about the disease? Take a quick risk assessment and diabetes quiz to find out!

How much do you know about diabetes? Take this quick quiz to find out!
What Do You Really Know About Diabetes?

Take a quick diabetes risk assessment today!
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